Tourist Attraction

Gaya
Gaya is 100 kilometers south of Patna, the capital city of Bihar. Situated on the banks of the Phalgu or Niranjana, as mentioned in Ramayana), it is a place sanctified by the Hindu, the Buddhist and the Jain religions. It is surrounded by small rocky hills (Mangla- Gauri, Shringa-Sthan, Ram-Shila and Brahmayoni) by three sides and the river flowing on the fourth (eastern) side. The city has a mix of natural surroundings, age old buildings and narrow bylanes.

Gaya is one of the most prominent Hindu pilgrim centres in India. From time immemorial, Hindu pilgrims from every part of India arrive at the Panchakroshi Gayakshetra with their offerings of Pinda to ensure peace for the departed souls of 12 generation of their deceased ancestors. It is said that an offering of Pinda at Gaya ensures heavenly ascent for the soul

How To Reach Gaya
One can reach Gaya by roadways, railways and by the air as the district is well connected by all the medium

By Road
The Grand Trunk Road (NH-2, which is undergoing a massive revival under The Golden Quadrilateral project) is about 30 km. from Gaya city. Thus, Gaya is well connected to Kolkata, Varanasi, Allahabad, Kanpur, Delhi, Amritsar.

By Rail
Gaya is the second most important station in Bihar after Patna. It is an important junction and is connected to the three metropolises New Delhi, Kolkata and Mumbai through Important Broad Gauge Routes There are direct trains from Gaya to other important stations in India like Ranchi, Varanasi, Lucknow, Kanpur, Allahabad, Agra, Mathura, Jabalpur, Bhopal, Indore, Nagpur, Puri, etc.

By Air
Gaya has the only international airport in Bihar and Jharkhand taken together. It is a small international airport connected to Colombo and Bangkok.


Vishnupad Temple

The Vishnupad Mandir is the 220 year old temple in Gaya, India. It is a Hindu temple, dedicated to Lord Vishnu. This temple is located along the Falgu River, marked by a footprint of Lord Vishnu known as Dharmasila, incised into a block of basalt. The Bhumihar Brahmins have been the traditional priests at Vishnupad Mandir in Gaya as Gayawar Pandas and in the adjoining districts like Hazaribagh.

History and location
The construction date of temple is unknown and it is believed that Rama along with Sita had visited this place. The present day structure was rebuilt by Devi Ahilya Bai Holkar, the ruler of Indore, in 1787, on the banks of the Falgu river. A flight of 1000 stone steps leads to the top of the Brahmajuni hill, 1 km southwest of the Vishnupad mandir. Visitors prefer to go to the top of Brahmajuni hill see magnificent view of temple from top.There are many small temples near this temple. Once a demon known as Gayasura, did a heavy penance and sought a boon that whoever see him should attain salvation (Moksham). Since salvation is achieved through being righteous in one's lifetime, people started obtaining it easily. To prevent immoral people from attaining salvation Lord Vishnu asked Gayasura to go beneath the earth and did so by placing his right foot on asura's head. After pushing Gayasura below the surface of earth, Lord Vishnu's foot print remained on the surface that we see even today. The footprint consists of nine different symbols including Shankam, Chakram and Gadham.


Manglagauri Temple

The Mangla Gauri temple in Gaya, Bihar, India has been mentioned in Padma Purana, Vayu Purana and Agni Purana and in other scriptures and tantric works .This temple is among the eighteen maha shakti peeth. The present temple dates back to 15th century. The shrine is dedicated to Shakti or the mother Goddess in the predominantly Vaishnavite pilgrimage center of Gaya.

History and location
The shrine is dedicated to Shakti or the mother Goddess in the predominantly Vaishnavite pilgrimage center of Gaya. Mangalagauri is worshiped as the Goddess of benevolence. This temple constitutes an Upa-Shakti Pitha - where it is believed that a part of the body of Shakti fell - according to mythology. Here Shakti is worshiped in the form of a breast symbol, a symbol of nourishment. It is believed that whoever comes to maa durga with his wishes and prayers, returns successfully with all of prayers and wishes come true. The temple is facing east, and is built on top of the Mangalagauri hill. A flight of steps and a motorable road lead to the temple. The sanctum houses the symbol of the Goddess and it also has some finely carved ancient relief sculptures. A small hall or mandap stands in front of the temple. The courtyard also houses a fire pit for the home. There are also two minor shrines dedicated to Shiva and images of Mahishasura Mardini, Durga and Dakshina Kali. The temple complex encompasses of temples of Maa Kali, Lord Ganesha, Lord Hanuman and Lord Shiva.


BODH GAYA

The birth place of Buddism, Bodhgaya is the place where lord Buddha attained enlightenment under Bodhi tree(Peepal tree). For Buddhists, Bodh Gaya is the most important of the main four pilgrimage sites related to the life of Gautama Buddha, the other three being Kushinagar, Lumbini, and Sarnath. In 2002, Mahabodhi Temple, located in Bodh Gaya, became a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

History and location
Bodh Gaya is the most hallowed place on earth to Buddhists the world over. Situated by the bank of river Neranjana the place was then known as Uruwela. King Ashoka was the first to build a temple here. Buddha was born 623 BC on the following auspicious Baisakhi purnima. As Siddhartha, he renounced his family at the age of 29 his gaining enlightenment in 588 BC and travelled and meditated in search of truth. After meditating for six years at Urubela (Buddhagaya) in Gaya, he attained Buddhatva or enlightenment.According to Buddhist traditions, circa 500 BC Prince Gautama Siddhartha, wandering as an ascetic, reached the sylvan banks of the Phalgu, near the city of Gaya.


Bodhi Tree

The Bodhi Tree, also known as Bo (from the [Tamil language|அரச மரம்]Sinhalese Bo) and 'peepal tree' in Nepal and Bhutan, was a large and very old Sacred located in Bodh Gaya, India, under which Siddhartha Gautama, the spiritual teacher later known as Gautama Buddha, is said to have achieved enlightenment, or Bodhi.


History and location
In religious iconography, the Bodhi tree is recognizable by its heart-shaped leaves, which are usually prominently displayed. Bodhi trees are planted in close proximity to every Buddhist monastery. The term "Bodhi Tree" is also widely applied to currently existing trees, particularly the Sacred Fig growing at the Mahabodhi Temple in Bodh Gaya, which is a direct descendant planted in 288 BC from the original specimen. This tree is a frequent destination for pilgrims, being the most important of the four main Buddhist pilgrimage sites. Other holy Bodhi trees which have a great significance in the history of Buddhism are the Anandabodhi tree in Sravasti and the Bodhi tree in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. Both are believed to have been propagated from the original Bodhi tree.


Shanti Stupa, Rajgir

Vishwa Shanti Stupa (Peace Pagoda), Makhdoom Kund and monasteries built by Japanese devotees of the Buddha on top of the Ratnagiri Hills. Vishwa Shanti Stupa, built in 1969, one of the 80 peace pagodas in the world, to spread the message of peace and non-violence.



History and location
The Vishwa Shanti Stupa was constructed at Ratnagiri Hill behind the Griddhkuta hill because it was at Griddhkuta that the Buddha delivered the Saddharma Pundarika Sutra the basis of Nichiren Sect. Also Rajgriha( Rajgir) is an historical place and was capital of the Ancient Magadha Empire. Ven. Fujii Gurujee believed Rajgriha played an important role in the installation of the Buddha as a religious leader.


Maha Bodhi Temple

The Mahabodhi Temple (महाबोधि मंदिर) (Literally: "Great Awakening Temple"), a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is a Buddhist temple in Bodh Gaya, marking the location where Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, is said to have attained enlightenment. Bodh Gaya (located in Gaya district) is located about 96 km (60 mi) from Patna, Bihar state, India.


History and location
In approximately 250 BCE, about 200 years after the Buddha attained Enlightenment, Buddhist Emperor Asoka visited Bodh Gaya in order to establish a monastery and shrine on the holy site.The new Mahabodhi temple included a diamond throne (called the Vajrasana) to mark the exact spot of the Buddha's enlightenment. While Asoka is considered the Mahabodhi temple's founder, the current structure dates from the 5th–6th century.One scholar, however, considers the building.


Barabar Caves

The Barabar Caves are the oldest surviving rock-cut caves in India,[1] mostly dating from the Mauryan period (322–185 BCE), and some with Ashokan inscriptions, located in the Bela Ganj Block of Gaya District of Bihar, India, 24 km north of Gaya. These caves are situated in the twin hills of Barabar (four caves) and Nagarjuni (three caves).


History and location
These caves are situated in the twin hills of Barabar (four caves) and Nagarjuni (three caves) - caves of the 1.6 km distant Nagarjuni Hill sometimes are singled out as Nagarjuni Caves. These rock-cut chambers date back to the 3rd century BC, Maurya period of Ashoka (r. 273 BC to 232 BC.) and his son, Dasaratha. Though Buddhists themselves, they allowed various Jain sects to flourish under a policy of religious tolerance. These caves were used by ascetics from the Ajivika founded by Makkhali Gosala, a contemporary of Siddhartha Gautama, the founder of Buddhism, and of Mahavira, the last and 24th Tirthankara of Jainism.Also found at the site were several rock-cut Buddhist and Hindu sculptures.


Nalanda Khandar

Nalanda Khandar was a great center of Buddhist learning in ancient times. A large number of Buddhist students thronged the Nalanda University to study Buddhism. According to the Chinese traveler Hieun Tsang, the place owed its name to a Naga, who resided in a local tank. Lord Vardhamana Mahavir and Lord Buddha visited Nalanda quite frequently in the 6th century BC.

History and location
Nalanda Khandar flourished between the reign of the Śakrāditya (whose identity is uncertain and who might have been either Kumara Gupta I or Kumara Gupta II) and 1197 AD, supported by patronage from the Hindu Gupta rulers as well as Buddhist emperors like Harsha and later emperors from the Pala Empire. The complex was built with red bricks and its ruins occupy an area of 14 hectares. (488 by 244 metres) At its peak, the university attracted scholars and students from as far away as Tibet, China, Greece, and Persia.Nalanda was ransacked and destroyed by a Turkish Muslim army under Bakhtiyar Khilji in 1193. The great library of Nalanda University was so vast that it is reported to have burned for three months after the invaders set fire to it, ransacked and destroyed the monasteries, and drove the monks from the site. In 2006, Singapore, China, India, Japan, and other nations, announced a proposed plan to restore and revive the ancient site as Nalanda International University.


Food & Resturant

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Contact Us

Infront of Gaya Railway Station
Station Road, Gaya - 823002
Bihar (INDIA)
Ph : +91631 2222961/2/3
Mob: +91 9798881223